Historias 14 - Mauricio Espinoza on superheroes and Latinx social realities in the U.S.

What do heroes and superheroes tell us about Latino and Latina social reality, identity, and belonging in the United States?

Dr. Mauricio Espinoza joined Dave McLaughlin to discuss how the figures of the Latino and Latina hero and superhero are used within multiple genres (film, graphic novel, Netflix, etc) to trouble notions of legality and illegality within the U.S. imaginary. Mauricio’s current book project discusses the process and offers vignettes from his research that illuminate how Latina and Latino identities have often been erased or downplayed at the expense of highlighting other characteristics that perpetuate certain myths about what it means to be and look “American.” He also discusses his work as a poet and editor and an upcoming bilingual edited volume he is organizing of selected works by Ohio poets writing in Spanish.
 


 
Additional resources:

Mauricio’s book of poetry Respiración de piedras
Mauricio Espinoza, “Neoliberalism in the Gutter: Latin American Comics and Society since the 1990s,” Studies in 20th & 21st Century 42, no. 1 (2017),
Mauricio’s department page
 

Historias 13 - Abbey Steele on Colombia's presidential elections

What do the results of yesterday’s presidential elections in Colombia reveal about this country attempting to exit decades of civil war?

Dr. Abbey Steele, an assistant professor in the department of political science at the University of Amsterdam, joined Dave and Steven to discuss the results in this hot take edition of Historias. Dr. Steele’s book Democracy and Displacement in Colombia’s Civil War (Cornell, 2017) explores the violent, tragic consequences of democratic elections and the forced migration of folk in the countryside.
 

 
Additional resources:

Abbey Steele, Democracy and Displacement in Colombia’s Civil War (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2017)

Abbey’s twitter feed
Abbey’s personal website
Abbey’s departmental page

Historias 12 - Lily Balloffet on migration, networks, and public outreach

Migration is a signature feature of the contemporary world that preoccupies still the attention of scholars and the concern of policymakers and the broader public.

Dr. Lily Balloffet sits down with Steven to discuss her research on eastern Mediterranean migrants to Argentina, her public outreach, and her interaction with the Museo de la Inmigración in Buenos Aires. In addition, Dr. Balloffet explains her introduction to Digital Humanities and its impact on her work and her pedagogy.
 

 
Additional resources:

 

Museo de la Inmigración

 

Lily on Academia.edu

 

Rwany Sibaja and Lily Balloffet, “Digital Approaches to Research and Pedagogy in Latin American Studies,” The Latin Americanist 62, no. 1 (2018), 99-117.

 

Lily Balloffet, “Argentine and Egyptian History Entangled: From Perón to Nasser,” Journal of Latin American Studies, published online October 30, 2017.

Historias 11 - Lisa Covert on San Miguel de Allende, historical memory, and economic development

What does the development of the tourist industry in San Miguel de Allende teach us about the history of Mexico and the contemporary world?

 

Dr. Lisa Covert joins Carlos and Steven to discuss her new book San Miguel de Allende: Mexicans, Foreigners, and the Making of a World Heritage Site and the importance of understanding local historical memory in the construction of national history.
 


 

Additional resources:
San Miguel de Allende World Heritage Site (website)
Lisa Pinley Covert, “The GI Bill Abroad: A Postwar Experiment in International Relations,” Diplomatic History 40, no. 2 (2016), 244-268.
Lisa Pinley Covert, “The Political Economy of Mexico’s Independence Heroes: Selling Public History in San Miguel de Allende,” The Latin Americanist 54, no. 4 (2010), 29-46.

Member Alison Bruey publishes a new book

Congratulations to SECOLAS member Alison J. Bruey on the upcoming publication of her new book Bread, Justice, and Liberty: Grassroots Activism and Human Rights in Pinochet’s Chile!

It is now available for pre-order from the University of Wisconsin Press at a discounted price of $30.

Discounts for course adoption are also available through the press.

Find it here and enter the discount code at checkout: AA101

Historias 10 - Eva Mehl on the Spanish Pacific World

What can convicts and sailors in the far off Philippines teach us about Spanish imperial history?

 
Dr. Eva Mehl discusses her book Forced Migration in the Spanish Pacific World: From Mexico to the Philippines, 1765-1811 that examines the importance of convicts and sailors in the development of a Spanish Pacific World. Dr. Mehl also talks about some of the methodological challenges and the importance of social history for better understanding the Spanish Philippines.
 

 
Additional resources:

Eva Mehl, “Mexican Recruits and Vagrants in Late Eighteenth-Century Philippines: Empire, Social Order, and Bourbon Reforms in the Spanish Pacific World,” Hispanic American Historical Review 94, no. 4 (2014), 547-579.

16th century rendering of Manila
(first known illustration of the town)
Museo Julio Bello y González, Puebla, México

Historias 9 - Monica Rankin

How did Nelson Rockefeller attempt to cultivate positive relationships with Latin America during World War II and what are the legacies of this initiative for inter-American relations?

 
Dr. Monica Rankin speaks with Steven about her forthcoming book on the Office for the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs. In addition, she speaks about her role as the Director for the Center for U.S.-Latin American Initiatives and what brings her to Buenos Aires.

 

The podcast was recorded at the historic El Hipopótamo in the San Telmo neighborhood of Buenos Aires, which provides the background soundtrack.

 

 

Additional Resources:

Mark Burkholder, Monica Rankin, and Lyman Johnson, Exploitation, Inequality, and Resistance: A History of Latin America Since Resistance (New York: Oxford University Press, 2017)

Monica A. Rankin, Mexico, la patria: Propaganda and Production during World War II  (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2010)

Monica A. Rankin, The History of Costa Rica (Greenwood, 2012)

1942 film produced by Rockefeller’s OCIAA

Historias 8 - Greg Weeks

What might the rise of Miguel Díaz-Canel to the Cuban presidency mean for Cuban-U.S. relations and for Cuba itself?

 

In this Historias hot take edition complete with a B side, Dr. Gregory Weeks speaks with Carlos and Steven about the uses of soft and hard power, the transition in Cuba, and how none of us should try to predict the future.

 

On the B-side, Greg discusses SECOLAS’ peer-reviewed journal The Latin Americanist and Steven learns about Peruvian ants.

 

 

Additional resources:
Greg Weeks, “Soft Power, Leverage, and the Obama Doctrine in Cuba,” The Latin Americanist 60:4 (2016), 525-540
Greg’s blog Two Weeks Notice
Greg’s podcast Understanding Latin American Politics (subscribe via iTunes)
Steven’s “Change is Coming to Cuba,” Huffington Post, January 18, 2015

Historias 7 - Jaclyn Sumner

What explains the endurance of Porfirio Díaz’s rule from 1876 to 1910 in Mexico?

Dr. Jaclyn Sumner joins Carlos and Steven to discuss her research on the Porfiriato and how Tlaxcala’s indigenous governor Próspero Cahuantzi (r. 1885-1911) provides important clues to its longevity. As SECOLAS’ current president, she also describes her goals for the organization and why Latin Americanists of all stripes should join us in Oaxaca next March.

 

Ann González publishes her latest book!

Congratulations to longtime member Ann B. González for her hot-off-the-press book Postcolonial Approaches to Latin American Children’s Literature!

Check it out!

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