Historias 23 - Miguel Tinker Salas on the crisis in Venezuela

Dr. Miguel Tinker Salas of Pomona College joined Dustin and Steven to discuss the various problems afflicting Venezuela today. Tinker Salas reminds us that to fully understand the economic, political, and humanitarian crises, one must understand the historical evolution of the oil industry, the myth of the país privilegiado, and such state institutions as the military.

Notum bonum: There’s a special treat for this episode’s intro and outro music, which features the song Tierra sin culpa by Ali Primera (source: archive.org). Our thanks to Miguel for the suggestion.
 
 

 
Additional resources:
 
Miguel’s website
 
Miguel on twitter
 
Venezuela: What Everyone Needs to Know (Oxford University Press, 2015)
 
The Enduring Legacy: Oil, Culture, and Society in Venezuela (Duke University Press, 2009)
 

Historias 22 - Martin Nesvig on the daily making and unmaking of empire in the Americas

Card sharks. Bigamists. Kidnappers. Brawlers. Drunks. Imposters. Assassins for hire. These are the people that played critical roles in the establishment of imperial Spanish rule in the 16th century Americas.
 
Dr. Martin Nesvig of the University of Miami spoke with Steven about his new book Promiscuous Power: An Unorthodox History of New Spain and the everyday practices of making and unmaking of empire.
 
Be sure to check out the extra time conversation with Martin.
 

 
Additional resources:
 
Martin’s webpage at The U
 
Promiscuous Power: An Unorthodox History of New Spain
 
Ideology and Inquisition: The World of the Censors in Early Mexico
 

Historias 21 - Lisa Munro on pernicious stereotypes in Guatemala and life #withaPhD

Dr. Lisa Munro spoke with Carlos about her research on the emergence of negative stereotypes of indigenous populations in Guatemala in the 1930s. They also discuss life #withaPhD, building community through social media, and her work leading writing workshops aimed at helping scholars and authors achieve their writing and publishing goals.

 

 

Additional resources:

Lisa’s website

 

Lisa’s twitter feed

 

Lisa’s company

Historias 20 - Charly St-Georges on the cultural lens of horror films in Latin America and Spain

Dr. Charles St-Georges of Denison University sat down with Dave McLaughlin to discuss his recent book Haunted Families and Temporal Normativity in Hispanic Horror Films – Troubling Timelines and its exploration of “three recent horror films from the Spanish-speaking world that, rather than explicitly referencing recent political violence, speak to the societal conditions and everyday normative violence that serve as preconditions for political violence.” They also discuss writing strategies, audience, and what’s next on Charly’s research agenda.

 

 

Additional resources:

Charly on Academia.edu

Films discussed in Charly’s book:

Los inocentes movie poster

Historias 19 - Juan José Ponce-Vázquez on smuggling in the 17th century Spanish Caribbean

Dr. Juan José Ponce-Vázquez joined Carlos and Steven to discuss his research on smuggling in the 17th century Spanish Caribbean. They also discuss writing strategies for finishing the first book, the value of social media, work-life balance, and what lay on Juanjo’s research horizon.
 
 

 
Additional resources:

Juanjo’s twitter feed

Juan José Ponce-Vázquez, “Unequal partners in crime: masters, slaves and free people of color in Santo Domingo, c.1600–1650,” Slavery and Abolition 37, no. 4 (2016), 704-723

Archivo General de Indias

  • To get to the documents of the AGI, you have to click on the tab “Inventario Dinámico” and select Archive General de Indias in the dropdown menu. The sections with the archive with digitalized documents have a little camera next to their names.
  • The Portal of Spanish archives can be very clunky and temperamental. This post might be helpful to those starting to use it.

Archivo General de la Nación (Dominican Republic)

  • Under “Servicios de Información Documental”, click on “Fondos Documentales.” The portal is called Calameo, and it is often down.
Map of San Domingo in the island of Hispaniola – Montanus – 1671

Historias 18 - Erika Edwards, Jackie Sumner and Dave McLaughlin on work-life balance

Historias is back!

In this episode, Drs. Erika Edwards, Jackie Sumner, and Dave McLaughlin join Steven to discuss such challenges of academia for junior faculty as experiencing the pressures of insecure employment, navigating tenure requirements, and building lives off campus.
 


 

Historias 14 - Mauricio Espinoza on superheroes and Latinx social realities in the U.S.

What do heroes and superheroes tell us about Latino and Latina social reality, identity, and belonging in the United States?

Dr. Mauricio Espinoza joined Dave McLaughlin to discuss how the figures of the Latino and Latina hero and superhero are used within multiple genres (film, graphic novel, Netflix, etc) to trouble notions of legality and illegality within the U.S. imaginary. Mauricio’s current book project discusses the process and offers vignettes from his research that illuminate how Latina and Latino identities have often been erased or downplayed at the expense of highlighting other characteristics that perpetuate certain myths about what it means to be and look “American.” He also discusses his work as a poet and editor and an upcoming bilingual edited volume he is organizing of selected works by Ohio poets writing in Spanish.
 


 
Additional resources:

Mauricio’s book of poetry Respiración de piedras
Mauricio Espinoza, “Neoliberalism in the Gutter: Latin American Comics and Society since the 1990s,” Studies in 20th & 21st Century 42, no. 1 (2017),
Mauricio’s department page
 

Historias 12 - Lily Balloffet on migration, networks, and public outreach

Migration is a signature feature of the contemporary world that preoccupies still the attention of scholars and the concern of policymakers and the broader public.

Dr. Lily Balloffet sits down with Steven to discuss her research on eastern Mediterranean migrants to Argentina, her public outreach, and her interaction with the Museo de la Inmigración in Buenos Aires. In addition, Dr. Balloffet explains her introduction to Digital Humanities and its impact on her work and her pedagogy.
 

 
Additional resources:

 

Museo de la Inmigración

 

Lily on Academia.edu

 

Rwany Sibaja and Lily Balloffet, “Digital Approaches to Research and Pedagogy in Latin American Studies,” The Latin Americanist 62, no. 1 (2018), 99-117.

 

Lily Balloffet, “Argentine and Egyptian History Entangled: From Perón to Nasser,” Journal of Latin American Studies, published online October 30, 2017.

Historias 11 - Lisa Covert on San Miguel de Allende, historical memory, and economic development

What does the development of the tourist industry in San Miguel de Allende teach us about the history of Mexico and the contemporary world?

 

Dr. Lisa Covert joins Carlos and Steven to discuss her new book San Miguel de Allende: Mexicans, Foreigners, and the Making of a World Heritage Site and the importance of understanding local historical memory in the construction of national history.
 


 

Additional resources:
San Miguel de Allende World Heritage Site (website)
Lisa Pinley Covert, “The GI Bill Abroad: A Postwar Experiment in International Relations,” Diplomatic History 40, no. 2 (2016), 244-268.
Lisa Pinley Covert, “The Political Economy of Mexico’s Independence Heroes: Selling Public History in San Miguel de Allende,” The Latin Americanist 54, no. 4 (2010), 29-46.

Historias 10 - Eva Mehl on the Spanish Pacific World

What can convicts and sailors in the far off Philippines teach us about Spanish imperial history?

 
Dr. Eva Mehl discusses her book Forced Migration in the Spanish Pacific World: From Mexico to the Philippines, 1765-1811 that examines the importance of convicts and sailors in the development of a Spanish Pacific World. Dr. Mehl also talks about some of the methodological challenges and the importance of social history for better understanding the Spanish Philippines.
 

 
Additional resources:

Eva Mehl, “Mexican Recruits and Vagrants in Late Eighteenth-Century Philippines: Empire, Social Order, and Bourbon Reforms in the Spanish Pacific World,” Hispanic American Historical Review 94, no. 4 (2014), 547-579.

16th century rendering of Manila
(first known illustration of the town)
Museo Julio Bello y González, Puebla, México

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