Historias 12 - Lily Balloffet on migration, networks, and public outreach

Migration is a signature feature of the contemporary world that preoccupies still the attention of scholars and the concern of policymakers and the broader public.

Dr. Lily Balloffet sits down with Steven to discuss her research on eastern Mediterranean migrants to Argentina, her public outreach, and her interaction with the Museo de la Inmigración in Buenos Aires. In addition, Dr. Balloffet explains her introduction to Digital Humanities and its impact on her work and her pedagogy.
 

 
Additional resources:

 

Museo de la Inmigración

 

Lily on Academia.edu

 

Rwany Sibaja and Lily Balloffet, “Digital Approaches to Research and Pedagogy in Latin American Studies,” The Latin Americanist 62, no. 1 (2018), 99-117.

 

Lily Balloffet, “Argentine and Egyptian History Entangled: From Perón to Nasser,” Journal of Latin American Studies, published online October 30, 2017.

Historias 11 - Lisa Covert on San Miguel de Allende, historical memory, and economic development

What does the development of the tourist industry in San Miguel de Allende teach us about the history of Mexico and the contemporary world?

 

Dr. Lisa Covert joins Carlos and Steven to discuss her new book San Miguel de Allende: Mexicans, Foreigners, and the Making of a World Heritage Site and the importance of understanding local historical memory in the construction of national history.
 


 

Additional resources:
San Miguel de Allende World Heritage Site (website)
Lisa Pinley Covert, “The GI Bill Abroad: A Postwar Experiment in International Relations,” Diplomatic History 40, no. 2 (2016), 244-268.
Lisa Pinley Covert, “The Political Economy of Mexico’s Independence Heroes: Selling Public History in San Miguel de Allende,” The Latin Americanist 54, no. 4 (2010), 29-46.

Historias 10 - Eva Mehl on the Spanish Pacific World

What can convicts and sailors in the far off Philippines teach us about Spanish imperial history?

 
Dr. Eva Mehl discusses her book Forced Migration in the Spanish Pacific World: From Mexico to the Philippines, 1765-1811 that examines the importance of convicts and sailors in the development of a Spanish Pacific World. Dr. Mehl also talks about some of the methodological challenges and the importance of social history for better understanding the Spanish Philippines.
 

 
Additional resources:

Eva Mehl, “Mexican Recruits and Vagrants in Late Eighteenth-Century Philippines: Empire, Social Order, and Bourbon Reforms in the Spanish Pacific World,” Hispanic American Historical Review 94, no. 4 (2014), 547-579.

16th century rendering of Manila
(first known illustration of the town)
Museo Julio Bello y González, Puebla, México

Historias 8 - Greg Weeks

What might the rise of Miguel Díaz-Canel to the Cuban presidency mean for Cuban-U.S. relations and for Cuba itself?

 

In this Historias hot take edition complete with a B side, Dr. Gregory Weeks speaks with Carlos and Steven about the uses of soft and hard power, the transition in Cuba, and how none of us should try to predict the future.

 

On the B-side, Greg discusses SECOLAS’ peer-reviewed journal The Latin Americanist and Steven learns about Peruvian ants.

 

 

Additional resources:
Greg Weeks, “Soft Power, Leverage, and the Obama Doctrine in Cuba,” The Latin Americanist 60:4 (2016), 525-540
Greg’s blog Two Weeks Notice
Greg’s podcast Understanding Latin American Politics (subscribe via iTunes)
Steven’s “Change is Coming to Cuba,” Huffington Post, January 18, 2015

Historias 7 - Jaclyn Sumner

What explains the endurance of Porfirio Díaz’s rule from 1876 to 1910 in Mexico?

Dr. Jaclyn Sumner joins Carlos and Steven to discuss her research on the Porfiriato and how Tlaxcala’s indigenous governor Próspero Cahuantzi (r. 1885-1911) provides important clues to its longevity. As SECOLAS’ current president, she also describes her goals for the organization and why Latin Americanists of all stripes should join us in Oaxaca next March.

 

Historias 6 - Michael Goebel

How do nationalist ideas emerge, evolve, and spread? How do urban spaces and the migration of people factor in?

Dr. Michael Goebel joins Steven to discuss the arc of his research, ranging from nationalism in twentieth-century Argentina, to anti-imperialist activism in interwar Paris, to comparing urban inequality in specific global port cities between 1850 and 1950. He also comments on his interest in putting into dialogue discrete fields of history, the benefits of this engagement, and the impetus for co-creating the Global Urban History Network.

 

Additional resources:
Global Urban History
Anti-Imperial Metropolis: Interwar Paris and the Seeds of Third World Nationalism (Cambridge UP, 2015)
Immigration and National Identities in Latin America (UP of Florida, 2014)
Argentina’s Partisan Past: Nationalism and the Politics of History (Liverpool UP, 2011)
‘The Capital of the Men without a Country’: Migrants and Anticolonialism in Interwar Paris,” The American Historical Review 121, no. 5 (2016), 1444-1467.
Gauchos, Gringos and Gallegos: The Assimilation of Italian and Spanish Immigrants in the Making of Modern Uruguay, 1880-1930,” Past and Present no. 208 (2010), 191-229.

Historias 5 - Aiala Levy

What are the digital humanities and how can it help one’s research project?

Dr. Aiala Levy of the University of Scranton speaks with Carlos Dimas about the field and the many tools available in the digital humanities. Dr. Levy also shares how she came to her research project on the imagining and creation of a mass urban public in a rapidly expanding turn-of-century São Paulo and how her personal experience and interest in digital humanities have shaped the study.

 

 

Additional resources:
Dr. Aiala Levy’s personal website
Theater’s in São Paulo, 1854-1924 (Dr. Levy on carto.com)
Alliance of Digital Humanities Organization
Digital History Resources (from the American Historical Association)
Lara Putnam, “The Transnational and the Text-Searchable: Digitized Sources and the Shadows They Cast,” American Historical Review 121, no. 2 (2016), 377-402.

Historias 4 - Steven Taylor

How will the recent congressional elections in Colombia influence the ongoing peace process? Political scientist Steven Taylor speaks with Carlos and Steven about FARC’s participation in the elections, the looming presidential elections, and what challenges remain for fully implementing the peace deal championed by outgoing president and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Juan Manuel Santos.

 
Additional resources:

Steven Taylor’s 2016 article “Colombia: On the Brink of Peace with the FARC?” in Origins: Current Events in Historical Perspective

Steven Taylor’s Voting Amid Violence: Electoral Democracy in Colombia (via Google books)

Alto Comisionado para la Paz (en español)

Colombia Peace: Monitoring Progress in Peace Dialogues (Washington Office on Latin America)

Historias 3 - Erika Edwards

Steven speaks with Erika Edwards, assistant professor of Latin American history at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, about her upcoming book on people of African-descent in Córdoba, Argentina, her role and goals as co-Executive Secretary of the Conference on Latin American History, and her community advocacy for Latinos in Charlotte.

 

Additional resources:

Department of History, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Conference on Latin American History

Latin Americans Working for Achievement

Historias 2 - Jonathan Brown

Steven Hyland speaks with Jonathan Brown, professor of history at the University of Texas, about his recent book on the Cuban Revolution and the research behind it. They also discuss intellectual itinerancy and the state and direction of Latin American history.

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