Mitla & Hierve el Agua

Trip information!

This excursion is on Sunday, March 31.

The ruins at Mitla consist of 5 “ruin clusters”. Archaeologists speculate that some of the ruins were used for ceremonial and religious purposes, while others served as palaces for the elite. Unique to Mitla are the greca decorations found on ruin walls.

Hierve el Agua is renowned for its natural springs and surrounding mountain beauty. Although the springs perpetually appear on the point of eruption, the natural temperature of the water fluctuates between 22 and 25 degrees Celsius (72 and 77 degrees Fahrenheit) allowing visitors to comfortably enjoy a refreshing dip in the springs. Furthermore, Hierve el Agua was a sacred spot for the ancient Zapotecs, thus archaeological investigations have discovered important information concerning the lives of the original inhabitants of the region. Archaeologists have recently discovered an irrigation system more than 2,500 years old. At Hierve el Agua, visitors may enjoy the option of swimming in one of its fabulous springs, or in a recently constructed pool.

Mitla
Hierva el Agua

Monte Alban and Arrazola

Trip information!

This trip takes place on Tuesday, March 26.

Monte Alban served as the ancient capital of the Zapotecs between 500 B.C. and 800 A.D. At its height the city was inhabited by more than 40,000 residents. Today, visitors can explore the site. Points of interest on the Grand Plaza include: temples and palaces; bas-reliefs of human figures known as the danzantes; a ball court; an observatory; and tombs that once held gold, silver, jade, alabaster and turquoise treasures (now housed at the Centro Cultural de Santo Domingo in Oaxaca City).

Arrazola, known for its alebrijes, or colorful hand-carved and painted animals that are seen in markets and tourist shops in and around Oaxaca. Students have the opportunity to visit local homes where the wooden creatures are produced.

The west side platform at the Monte Alban pyramid complex. By Nsaum75 at English Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=12440330

A day with Fundación En Vía

On Wednesday, March 27, attendees of the 66th annual meeting will have the opportunity to join Fundación En Vía, a non-profit organization that works to empower women to better support themselves and their families. We use funds generated through responsible tourism to provide interest-free loans and educational programs to entrepreneurial women in 5 communities in the Tlacolula Valley of Oaxaca, Mexico. 

The organization’s tours offer a unique glimpse into life in Oaxaca through the perspective of individual artisans and business women. We visit small communities just outside of the city of Oaxaca where you will meet hard-working, optimistic, and problem-solving women who are part of En Vía’s microloan program. You will hear directly from these women about their businesses, their communities, and their experiences with micro-finance.

The tours highlight artisanal trades, traditional foods, local economy, and of course En Vía’s micro-finance model.

Participants will gain not only a better understanding of the challenges of life here – in the second poorest state of Mexico – but also help provide a viable path out of poverty. We use your tour donation to fund our loan and education programs.  

For further information, contact us at secolas-org@uncc.edu.

Historias 37 – James Mestaz. Environmental Series: Water in Revolutionary Mexico

James Mestaz, a post-doctoral fellow at Claremont-McKenna College, joined Carlos to discuss his research on water, the indigenous Mayo communities in northwestern Mexico, and revolutionary state between the 1920s and 1970s.

Historias 37 – James Mestaz
The Mayo River, Mesa Colorado, Sonora, Mexico

Historias 36 – Mike Allison on the elections in El Salvador

In this episode, professor of political science Michael Allison discusses  the February 3, 2019 presidential election in El Salvador. With Nayib Bukele from the GANA party emerging as the victor, Bukele is the first candidate since the end of the Civil War not from the two dominant political parties. Allison offers what this election means for not only El Salvador and Latin America, but the Americas as a whole. 

Historias 36 – Mike Allison

Additional resources:

Mike on twitter

Mike’s departmental webpage

Mike’s blog on Central American politics

Oaxaca 2019 – Day Trips are now open for registration and payment

If you arrive in Oaxaca early or stay late, we have some excursion opportunities for your consideration.

Check out the following day trip options:

Click here for further information about Fundación En Vía.

Registration for these excursions will close on Friday, March 8, 2019.

Joseluisjuarezperez [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

Historias 35 – Bianca Premo

Carlos spoke with Dr. Bianca Premo, Professor in the Department of History at Florida International University, to discuss her past and current research and time in the archives.

Dr. Premo is scholar with a wide range of research interests in Latin American history, including childhood and youth, the law, intellectual history, gender, slavery and ethnohistory.

Her original regional expertise was in the colonial Andes and Lima, Peru, but in recent years Dr. Premo has explored the history of Mexico City, Oaxaca, and the rural region around the city of Toledo.

Current research projects are bringing her back to Lima and sending her off to the twentieth century.

Historias 35 – Bianca Premo

Additional resources:

Bianca’s website

AHA Member Spotlight (September 18, 2018)

The Enlightenment on Trial: Ordinary Litigants and Colonialism in the Spanish Empire. New York: Oxford University Press, 2017.

Custom Today: Temporality, Law, and Indigenous Enlightenment,” Hispanic American Historical Review 94, no. 3 (2014): 355-79.

Raising an Empire: Children in Early Modern Iberia and Colonial Latin America, edited with Ondina González. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2007.

Children of the Father King: Youth, Authority and Legal Minority in Colonial Lima. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2005.

Edi Sánchez Solís, “Varayoq” from exhibit “Tusuq,” Cusco, June 2018

Historias 34 – Lyman Johnson. Luminaries series. Part 2.

Enjoy the second half of Steven’s conversation with Dr. Lyman Johnson, professor emeritus in the Department of History at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.

Among many other intellectual activities, Lyman is the founding editor of the Diálogos series from the University of New Mexico Press and author of Workshop of Revolution: Plebeian Buenos Aires and the Atlantic World, 1776–1810. In recognition of his contribution to the field, he received the Distinguished Service Award from the Conference on Latin American History in 2015 and the Nason-Sadler Distinguished Service Award from Rocky Mountain Council of Latin American Studies in 2013.

Lyman Johnson 2

Additional resources:

Have we loved the book to death?” 2015 CLAH Distinguished Service Award Lecture

‘A Lack of Legitimate Obedience and Respect’: Slaves and Their Masters in the Courts of Late Colonial Buenos Aires,” Hispanic American Historical Review 87, no. 4 (2007), 631-657.

With Zephyr Frank, “Cities and Wealth in the South Atlantic: Buenos Aires and Rio de Janeiro before 1860,” Comparative Studies in Society and History 48, no. 3 (2006), 634-668.

Historias 33 – Lyman Johnson. Luminaries series.

In the inaugural episode of our Luminaries series, Steven spoke with Dr. Lyman Johnson, professor emeritus of history at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Lyman’s impact on Latin American history is broad and deep. Along with Mark Burkholder, he is author of Colonial Latin America and is the founding editor of the Diálogos series from the University of New Mexico Press.

Lyman’s research agenda has earned him three NEH awards and three Fulbrights. His Workshop of Revolution: Plebeian Buenos Aires and the Atlantic World, 1776–1810 is the culmination of decades of research on the lives of non-elite in one of the most transformative epochs in the Americas.

Finally, his peers have recognized Lyman’s commitment to the field by awarding him the Distinguished Service Award from the Conference on Latin American History in 2015 and the Nason-Sadler Distinguished Service Award from Rocky Mountain Council of Latin American Studies in 2013.

Historias 33 – Lyman Johnson 1

Additional resources:

Have we loved the book to death?” 2015 CLAH Distinguished Service Award Lecture

‘A Lack of Legitimate Obedience and Respect’: Slaves and Their Masters in the Courts of Late Colonial Buenos Aires,” Hispanic American Historical Review 87, no. 4 (2007), 631-657.

With Zephyr Frank, “Cities and Wealth in the South Atlantic: Buenos Aires and Rio de Janeiro before 1860,” Comparative Studies in Society and History 48, no. 3 (2006), 634-668.

Historias 30 – Raul Pacheco-Vega. Environmental Series: Water (winter repeat)

This episode is the final winter repeat! We are starting Monday with new conversations.

In this encore edition, Dr. Raul Pacheco-Vega joined Carlos and Dustin to discuss his research on water, waste, resource management, and the importance of research having a positive impact on communities, especially its most marginal members. They also discuss his use of social media to offer mentorship and guidance for graduate students and early career academics.

Additional resources:

RPV’s personal website

RPV on twitter

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